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Alumni

Your Packaging Is the Problem

Caroline James ’22 , director of sustainability at Atlantic Packaging, says the current plastics recycling system is broken. She explains how new efforts by businesses and governments could move us toward a more sustainable and circular economy.

Bundles of crushed plastic containers
  • Exploring the Business of Space

    Dramatic reductions in payload costs have spurred tremendous innovation in space technologies. John-Paul Menez ’07 warns that the finance, insurance, and legal infrastructure supporting space firms must make similar advances if the sector is going to mature.

    A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifting off from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida on October 5.
  • The Role of Business after Roe

    In the wake of the Supreme Court’s Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization decision, access to reproductive healthcare varies widely from state to state. In a recent Yale SOM conversation, alumni and faculty discussed how businesses can advocate for the preservation of that access on behalf of their employees, customers, and other stakeholders.

    Pro-choice protesters
  • The Reckonings Facing the Theater

    The challenges of the last several years, including the upheaval of COVID-19 and the anti-racism movement that followed George Floyd’s murder, have had profound consequences for American theater. In a recent conversation with Yale SOM, three Yale alumni in the industry offered their perspectives on what comes next.

    Audience members wearing masks in a theater.
  • How the Streaming Wars Will Alter the Media Landscape

    The scramble for subscribers has been a boon for consumers. But changes are coming as investors demand returns. We talked to analyst Michael Nathanson ’90 about what will be left when the dust settles.

    An illustration of streaming services showing on several old televisions
  • Leading after Roe

    Amanda Skinner ’08, CEO and president of Planned Parenthood of Southern New England, discusses the consequences of the Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization decision for women’s health and economic lives, and for her organization.

    Pro-choice protesters outside a Planned Parenthood location in St. Louis in 2019.
  • How Superintendents Can Restore Public Trust in Schools

    Despite challenges like the scorched-earth debates on curricula, Caitlin Sullivan ’13, co-founder of Leading Now, sees superintendents as uniquely positioned to cross lines of difference and find common ground.

    Parents at a rally against critical race theory in schools
  • Seth Goldman on the Not-So-Sweet End of Honest Tea

    Seth Goldman called Coke’s decision to discontinue Honest Tea a “gut punch.” But the outcry from disappointed fans of the not-too-sweet drink have inspired him to return to tea.

    Seth Goldman
  • Why Does Spending on Drugs Keep Going Up?

    Eric Tichy ’18, vice chair of pharmacy formulary at the Mayo Clinic, explains what’s driving pharmaceutical spending and what the trends mean for patients, providers, and pharma companies.

    A bottle containing remdesivir powder
  • Moving Consumer Brands to Climate Neutral

    A nonprofit co-founded by Austin Whitman ’07 is helping consumers direct their spending to brands that are serious about solving climate change by certifying companies that measure their emissions, offset them in the short-term, and move toward decarbonization.

    Solar panels on the roof of a warehouse at the Sonae MC food logistics hub in Azambuja, Portugal.
  • Taking on Systemic Inequities

    On the latest episode of the Health & Veritas podcast, Howard Forman and Harlan Krumholz are joined by Dr. Cece Calhoun ’21, a Yale sickle cell disease specialist. They discuss Calhoun’s journey from growing up in Detroit to a clinical and research career focused on the health of the Black community.

    Dr. Cece Calhoun