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Technology

AI Can Write a More Believable Restaurant Review Than a Human Can

Yale SOM’s Balázs Kovács used ChatGPT to write a series of Yelp-style reviews, as well as collecting real reviews from the site, and then asked human subjects to decide which was the real thing. They were more convinced of the authenticity of the AI-written reviews.

A robot sitting at a table at a restaurant, writing a Yelp review on a smartphone
  • Can Bias Be Eliminated from Algorithms?

    The predictive software used to automate decision-making often discriminates against disadvantaged groups. A new approach devised by Soheil Ghili at Yale SOM and his colleagues could significantly reduce bias while still giving accurate results.

    A graphic showing data being processed
  • How ‘Stablecoins’ Could Unleash Chaos

    Dollar-pegged cryptocurrencies are rapidly proliferating. But without regulation, these so-called stablecoins pose serious risks to the U.S. financial system, argue Yale SOM’s Gary B. Gorton and his co-author.

    An illustration of a bank supported by columns of precarious coins
  • Blockchain Technology Can Help Consumers Tip Farmers—But Should It?

    Apps that track food supply chains could make it easier for customers to tip the farmer who produced their coffee or cocoa. But a new paper suggests that this well-intended feature might reduce farmers’ overall income.

    Brazilian coffee farmer Josias Gomes on his family's land in 2017. Photo: Mauro Pimentel/AFP via Getty Images.
  • Does Big Tech Gobble Up Competitors?

    An executive order from President Joe Biden last month and a congressional report in October accused large technology firms of engaging in “killer acquisitions,” citing research by Yale SOM’s Florian Ederer.

    A crocodile with two fish in its mouth
  • Can Congress Create Real Competition for Big Tech? 

    Last week, members of Congress from both parties introduced a series of bills to curtail the dominance of the major technology firms. We asked Prof. Fiona Scott Morton if the proposed legislation would help level the playing field.

    A group of apps for Google, Amazon, Apple, and Facebook in "jiggle mode," with delete buttons on each one
  • Social Media Is Addictive. Do Regulators Need to Step In?

    Yale SOM’s Fiona Scott Morton and her co-authors argue that smarter and more robust antitrust enforcement can help, by making room for new social media platforms that promote themselves as healthier alternatives.

    An illustration of someone reaching through a smartphone screen and reaching for likes and other social media icons
  • How Better Mobile Crowdsourcing Can Help Combat Food Waste and Feed the Hungry

    Yale SOM’s Vahideh Manshadi and Scott Rodilitz worked with Food Rescue US to hone their strategy for connecting volunteers with food donations. Their findings can help other nonprofits harness the power of crowds for social good.

    Volunteers making a food delivery.
  • Create Trust Online by Pairing User Control and Data Security

    In a new study, Yale SOM’s K. Sudhir and his co-author examine the impact of the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). They find that strict privacy rights paired with strong data security mandates create an atmosphere of trust that makes data sharing more beneficial for both firms and their customers.

    A man sitting at a computer, with a large eye on the computer screen, a phone, and a tablet
  • Study: Improved Video Game Technology Contributed to Decline in Work by Younger Men

    Between the 2000s and the 2010s, weekly recreational computer use by men in their 20s rose by 2.7 hours; at the same time, working hours for this group dropped by 1.8 hours. A study co-authored by Yale SOM Dean Kerwin K. Charles concludes that improving technology caused much of the increase in gaming, and nearly half of the decline in working hours for young men.

    A young man wearing a headset playing a video game, seen from behind
  • Is Bitcoin a Bubble?

    The price of a single Bitcoin is up more than 700% since the beginning of 2020, defying years of predictions of a crash. We asked Prof. Aleh Tsyvinski, professor of economics at Yale, to shed some light on the continuing phenomenon.

    Bitcoins floating in a bubble on a black background