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Economic Development

How Systems Thinking Can Help Stop Neglected Tropical Diseases

Despite being easy and inexpensive to treat, a group of common bacterial and parasitic infections kill hundreds of thousands of people in tropical countries each year. In a new paper, Yale SOM’s Teresa Chahine and her co-authors map the complex system of stakeholders surrounding the diseases and identify key leverage points for making progress. 

Students receiving a deworming treatment at a school in Rwanda.
  • Can we end poverty?

    Esther Duflo, a development economist at MIT and director of the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab, explains how our understanding of the economic lives of the poor has grown more complex in recent years. While Duflo doesn't see any silver bullet that will end poverty, she points to progress, in part from the use of randomized control trials to solve specific problems.
  • Can coffee help juice economic development?

    A nonprofit is teaching business skills to East African farmers in order to let them enter the high-profit global market for specialty coffee. The project showed enough promise to get $50 million in underwriting from the Gates Foundation, and now aims to reach 180,000 growers. David Browning ’99 of Technoserve describes how to educate small-hold farmers to plug into the global market.
  • Where does Africa fit in the globalization puzzle?

    The continent has often been singled out as an exception to the story of increasing globalization. Todd Moss, an Africa expert with the Center for Global Development, discusses Africa’s integration in world markets, why trade between African countries is so hard, and the role of outside powers such as China.
  • Has globalization failed in Nigeria?

    Oil pumped from the Niger Delta is loaded on supertankers and shipped into the global market, accounting for 3% of world production and generating substantial revenues for the Nigerian government. What has this connection to the world economy done for Nigeria?
  • Can capital overcome the past?

    A South African government program aimed at addressing deep historical inequities enabled a union-owned investment fund to build up enough capital to reach around the globe. The mostly black workers in the union now own a piece of a hotel chain in the Middle East and a clean-energy company in Pittsburgh. How much can be learned from this success?