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COVID19

Did ‘Lockdown Fatigue’ Diminish the Effectiveness of COVID-19 Restrictions?

COVID-19 restrictions on group gatherings and businesses stretched on for months. Did they continue to save lives? In a new study, Yale SOM’s Matthew Spiegel examines how the effectiveness of restrictions evolved over time.

A socially distanced and masked staff meeting
  • For Holiday Cheer, Switch Off Zoom and Pick Up the Phone

    After an extraordinarily difficult year, we are all looking for respite from the isolation and uncertainty of pandemic life. We asked Marissa King, who studies personal and team dynamics, to share some quick tips for making this year’s holiday season a little brighter.

    A rotary phone on a table
  • Maintaining Momentum on Climate Change

    Tyler Van Leeuwen ’14 of Shell explains explains how his internal skunkworks team helps move Shell toward its decarbonization goals.

    An illustration of an electric car moving through a landscape of wind turbines
  • Study Shows Which Restrictions Prevent COVID-19 Fatalities—and Which Appear to Make Things Worse

    New research from Yale SOM’s Heather Tookes and Matthew Spiegel finds that mask mandates, closing restaurants, and stay-at-home orders are all effective at saving lives, but other commonly used measures can actually worsen the spread of the pandemic.

    A sign reading "everyone is required to wear a mask" at Playland’s Castaway Cove, an amusement park in Ocean City, New Jersey, in September 2020. Photo: Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images.
  • Pharma Collaborates in the Fight against the Pandemic

    Nandish Poluru ’13 discusses the pharmaceutical industry’s unprecedented cooperative efforts to treat and prevent COVID-19.

    Scientists gathered around a lab table working with test tubes in concert.
  • A Life-Changing Vaccine, If We Do It Right 

    Pfizer’s announcement that its experimental COVID-19 vaccine appears to be more than 90% effective has provided hope for relief from the increasingly calamitous onslaught of the virus. We asked Yale SOM’s Dr. Howard Forman about next steps.

    Gloved hands preparing to make an injection into a person's shoulder
  • Building Blocks for Change

    We talked to Judith Scimone ’00, chief talent officer at MetLife, about her path into workforce management and what she has learned in a year shaped by the COVID-19 pandemic and the Black Lives Matter movement.

    An illustration of a woman sitting in front of her computer having a Zoom meeting.
  • Delivering Holistic Healthcare in an Underserved Community

    Dr. Suzanne Lagarde ’14 describes how her federally qualified nonprofit health center is both adapting and expanding to meet new needs in an underserved community.

    An illustration of a clinic at the center of a neighborhood
  • What Can Smartphone Location Data Tell Us about the Pandemic?

    Yale SOM’s Kevin Williams and his co-authors used cellphone location data to create a data set tracking movement during COVID-19, which is publicly available for researchers.

    A satellite view of North America at night
  • Testing Sewage Can Provide an Early Warning of COVID-19 Outbreaks

    Earlier this year, a team of Yale researchers showed that the concentration of COVID-19 RNA in sewage mirrors the spread of the disease through a population. In a new study, they find that testing sewage can serve as an early indicator of an outbreak relative to hospitalizations.

    A transmission electron micrograph of SARS-CoV-2 virus particles. Courtesy of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.
  • During the COVID-19 Crash, Investors’ Beliefs Didn’t Match Their Behavior

    Despite a general wave of pessimism following the COVID-19 stock crash in March, few investors made significant changes to their portfolios, according to new research from Yale SOM’s Stefano Giglio.

    A trader at the New York Stock Exchange on February 28, 2020. Photo: Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images.