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COVID19

To Stop a Pandemic in Its Tracks, Coordinate across Borders

New research co-authored by Yale SOM’s Paul Goldsmith-Pinkham shows that a proactive approach, in which jurisdictions respond to infections in neighboring areas, can dramatically lower spread in the early stages of an epidemic.

A map with red dots representing infection spreading across borders
  • What Can Smartphone Location Data Tell Us about the Pandemic?

    Yale SOM’s Kevin Williams and his co-authors used cellphone location data to create a data set tracking movement during COVID-19, which is publicly available for researchers.

    A satellite view of North America at night
  • Testing Sewage Can Provide an Early Warning of COVID-19 Outbreaks

    Earlier this year, a team of Yale researchers showed that the concentration of COVID-19 RNA in sewage mirrors the spread of the disease through a population. In a new study, they find that testing sewage can serve as an early indicator of an outbreak relative to hospitalizations.

    A transmission electron micrograph of SARS-CoV-2 virus particles. Courtesy of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.
  • During the COVID-19 Crash, Investors’ Beliefs Didn’t Match Their Behavior

    Despite a general wave of pessimism following the COVID-19 stock crash in March, few investors made significant changes to their portfolios, according to new research from Yale SOM’s Stefano Giglio. 

    A trader at the New York Stock Exchange on February 28, 2020. Photo: Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images.
  • The Art World in the Age of COVID

    COVID created a crisis for the art world when museums, galleries, and art fairs were closed down. Is there reason for hope about what will emerge after the pandemic ends?

    Visitors at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York City in September 2020. Photo: Jeenah Moon/Bloomberg via Getty Images.
  • In Defense of (Mathematical) Models

    Epidemiological models have played an influential role in governments’ responses to the COVID-19 pandemic. Yale SOM’s Edieal Pinker takes a look back at one of the most influential models and argues that such rigorous efforts at understanding the likely course of the disease, while imperfect, are critical to good decision making.

    A chart of ICU occupancy under various scenarios from Imperial College London
  • How Is the Airline Industry Adapting to COVID?

    Debilitated by COVID-19, airlines are preparing to cut more than 30,000 jobs as soon as next month. We asked Prof. Kevin Williams to explain some of the economics of air travel and how the industry can survive in an age of stay-at-home orders.

    A contractor disinfecting a Frontier airplane at Denver International Airport in May 2020. Photo: AAron Ontiveroz/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images.
  • Adapting in India

    Bikram Sohal ’97, who began the year leading the Indian office of a global ad-tech company, describes the impact of COVID-19 in India, a country with deep ties to the global economy but where much of the economy is still informal.

    An illustration of people lined up for COVID checks in India
  • Seeking Scalable Solutions to Poverty

    Prof. Mushfiq Mobarak describes the arc of his research on scalable, evidence-based policy responses to poverty and how existing research tools have been applied to fight COVID.

    Garment workers demonstrating in Dhaka, Bangladesh, on September 20, 2020. Photo: Mamunur Rashid/NurPhoto via Getty Images.
  • Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont

    A year into his term as governor of Connecticut, Ned Lamont ’80 found himself with a new agenda: responding to the state’s outbreak of COVID-19, one of the first and most severe in the country. We talked with him about the partnerships he formed to bring down Connecticut’s infection rate and the risks that lie ahead.

    An illustration of Governor Ned Lamont speaking to the press wearing a mask on the beach
  • Adapting Primary Care to a Pandemic

    Dr. Frank Ciminiello ’19 explains how his medical practice has reconfigured to safely meet patients’ needs.

    An illustration of a patient and a doctor in an exam room, both wearing masks